The Uprooted

The Uprooted
Author: Susan F. Martin,Patricia Weiss Fagen,Kari M. Jorgensen
Release: 2005
Editor: Lexington Books
Pages: 306
ISBN: 0739110837
Language: en
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Examines the progress and persistent shortcomings of the current humanitarian regime that are creating the gaps and inefficiencies of agencies to reach entire categories of forced migrants. Recommends policies to improve international, national, and local responses in areas including organization, security, funding, and durability of response.

The Time of the Uprooted

The Time of the Uprooted
Author: Elie Wiesel
Release: 2007-02-06
Editor: Schocken
Pages: 315
ISBN: 9780805211771
Language: en
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Gamaliel Friedman is only a child when his family flees Czechoslovakia in 1939 for the relative safety of Hungary. For him, it will be the beginning of a life of rootlessness, disguise, and longing. Five years later, in desperation, Gamaliel’s parents entrust him to a young Christian cabaret singer named Ilonka. With his Jewish identity hidden, Gamaliel survives the war. But in 1956, to escape the stranglehold of communism, he leaves Budapest after painfully parting from Ilonka. Gamaliel tries, unsuccessfully, to find a place for himself in Europe. After a failed marriage, he moves to New York, where he works as a ghostwriter, living through the lives of others. Eventually he falls in with a group of exiles, including a rabbi––a mystic whose belief in the potential for grace in everyday life powerfully counters Gamaliel’s feelings of loss and dispossession. When Gamaliel is asked to help draw out an elderly, disfigured Hungarian woman who may be his beloved Ilonka, he begins to understand that a real life in the present is possible only if he will reconcile with his past.

The Uprooted

The Uprooted
Author: Dorit Bader Whiteman
Release: 2007-10-10
Editor: Da Capo Press
Pages: 464
ISBN: 9780738212074
Language: en
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Whiteman, who escaped from Nazi-occupied Austria with her family, is now a clinical psychologist in New York. Her impassioned, riveting study of the Jews who managed to leave Germany and Austria before Hitler implemented mass executions and death camps is based partly on interviews with 190 escapees. She tells the incredible story of the Kindertransport operation, which took 10,000 Jewish children from Nazi-occupied countries to England by train and ferry. Adolf Eichmann, then an emigration official, disdainfully approved this mass exodus. We learn of the formidable barriers escapees faced in getting out, of horrid or supportive foster homes, of the trauma and pain of being forcibly uprooted. Many escapees endured years of poverty before re-establihsing themselves. Whiteman rejects Hannah Arendt's thesis that German Jews' cultural assimilation led to their political blindness in a "fool's paradise." This is a distinctive contribution to Holocaust literature.

The Uprooted The Epic Story of the Great Migrations That Made the American People

The Uprooted  The Epic Story of the Great Migrations That Made the American People
Author: Oscar Handlin
Release: 2021-12-09
Editor: Plunkett Lake Press
Pages: 329
ISBN:
Language: en
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“The Uprooted: The Epic Story of the Great Migrations That Made the American People, which won the 1952 Pulitzer for history, was aimed at an audience of general readers in making his case that immigration — more than the frontier experience, or any other episode in its past — was the continuing, defining event of American history. Dispensing with footnotes and writing in a lyrical style, Dr. Handlin emphasized the common threads in the experiences of the 30 million immigrants who poured into American cities between 1820 and the turn of the century. Regardless of nationality, religion, race or ethnicity, he wrote, the common experience was wrenching hardship, alienation and a gradual Americanization that changed America as much as it changed the newcomers. The book used a form of historical scholarship considered unorthodox at the time, employing newspaper accounts, personal letters and diaries as well as archives.” — Paul Vitello, The New York Times “[Oscar Handlin] has charged his pages with poetry and feeling... The Uprooted is history with a difference — the difference being its concern with men’s hearts and souls no less than an event.” — Milton Rugoff, The New York Times “Seldom in our historical literature have we been offered such detailed, realistic pictures of what it meant to come to the New World. The crossing itself, the struggle to make a living in the New World, the problems of housing, social fellowship, religion, adjustment to democracy — a chapter is devoted to each of these. The social and political pressures, the friction and misunderstanding between generations, the awful realization that the adjustment was too great — this reviewer knows of no book that captures these moods and situations with such sympathy and understanding... This is not, in either style or format, conventional or scholarly history... The style is not pedantic or heavy. The author is imaginative, sensitive, understanding. A tremendous amount of research and real depth of understanding lies behind the book.” — Ralph Adams Brown, The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science “[S]trong stuff, handled in a masterly and quite moving way.” — The New Yorker “This is a book of fundamental importance. For the first time it attempts to get at the inner meaning of an experience crucial in the development of the United States. It makes the attempt with a back- ground of imaginative research, a perceptiveness, and a literary skill rare in the modern writing of history... no one should attempt serious work in modern American history without fully reckoning with The Uprooted.” — Eric F. Goldman, The Journal of Southern History “Dr. Handlin’s The Uprooted deserves every bit of the praise and honors that have been heaped upon it. Dealing with an important area of American history without deviating from scholarly standards, the author succeeded in penetrating the façade of historical data to reach the drama of the historical process. The book is not only beautifully written and alive with human interest, but also highly pertinent to current social and political events in the United States... [Dr. Handlin] has handled his material magnificently, and every immigrant and descendant of an immigrant — that is, every American — ought to read this book in order the better to understand himself and his ancestors.” — Solomon Grayzel, Publications of the American Jewish Historical Society “[T]he best historical interpretation of the inner meaning of migration.” — John Higham, Pacific Historical Review “Dr. Handlin has discharged his responsibility admirably. An able scholar of immigration history, Dr. Handlin, in the present work... reveals a mastery of historical data and rare insight and understanding of the manifold problems of the immigrant. The book is beautifully written, and many passages are truly moving... Americans would understand their country better if they would read this book and benefit from the humane spirit in which it is written.” — Carl Wittke, The New England Quarterly

The Uprooted

The Uprooted
Author: Christina Elizabeth Firpo
Release: 2016-01-31
Editor: University of Hawaii Press
Pages: 281
ISBN: 9780824858117
Language: en
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For over a century French officials in Indochina systematically uprooted métis children—those born of Southeast Asian mothers and white, African, or Indian fathers—from their homes. In many cases, and for a wide range of reasons—death, divorce, the end of a romance, a return to France, or because the birth was the result of rape—the father had left the child in the mother's care. Although the program succeeded in rescuing homeless children from life on the streets, for those in their mothers' care it was disastrous. Citing an 1889 French law and claiming that raising children in the Southeast Asian cultural milieu was tantamount to abandonment, colonial officials sought permanent, "protective" custody of the children, placing them in state-run orphanages or educational institutions to be transformed into "little Frenchmen." The Uprooted offers an in-depth investigation of the colony's child-removal program: the motivations behind it, reception of it, and resistance to it. Métis children, Eurasians in particular, were seen as a threat on multiple fronts—colonial security, white French dominance, and the colonial gender order. Officials feared that abandoned métis might become paupers or prostitutes, thereby undermining white prestige. Métis were considered particularly vulnerable to the lure of anticolonialist movements—their ambiguous racial identity and outsider status, it was thought, might lead them to rebellion. Métischildren who could pass for white also played a key role in French plans to augment their own declining numbers and reproduce the French race, nation, and, after World War II, empire. French child welfare organizations continued to work in Vietnam well beyond independence, until 1975. The story of the métis children they sought to help highlights the importance—and vulnerability—of indigenous mothers and children to the colonial project. Part of a larger historical trend, the Indochina case shows striking parallels to that of Australia's "Stolen Generation" and the Indian and First Nations boarding schools in the United States and Canada. This poignant and little known story will be of interest to scholars of French and Southeast Asian studies, colonialism, gender studies, and the historiography of the family.

Against the Uprooted Word

Against the Uprooted Word
Author: Tristram Wolff
Release: 2022-10-11
Editor: Stanford University Press
Pages: 410
ISBN: 9781503633568
Language: en
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In this revisionist account of romantic-era poetry and language philosophy, Tristram Wolff recovers vibrant ways of thinking language and nature together. Wolff argues that well-known writers including Phillis Wheatley Peters, William Blake, William Wordsworth, and Henry David Thoreau offer a radical chronopolitics in reaction to the "uprooted word," or the formal analytic used to classify languages in progressive time according to a primitivist timeline of history and a hierarchy of civilization. Before the bad naturalisms of nineteenth-century race science could harden language into place as a metric of social difference, poets and thinkers try to soften, thicken, deepen, and dissolve it. This naturalizing tendency makes language more difficult to uproot from its active formation in the lives of its speakers. And its "gray romanticism" simultaneously gives language different kinds of time—most strikingly, the deep time of geologic form—to forestall the hardening of time into progress. Reorienting romantic studies to consider colonialism's pervasive effects on theories of language origin, Wolff shows us the ambivalent position of romantics in this history. His reparative reading makes visible language's ability to reimagine social forms.

Words of the Uprooted

Words of the Uprooted
Author: Robert A. Rockaway
Release: 2018-09-05
Editor: Cornell University Press
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9781501724633
Language: en
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American Jewish leaders, many of German extraction, created the Industrial Removal Office (IRO) in 1901 in order to disperse unemployed Jewish immigrants from New York City to smaller Jewish communities throughout the United States. The IRO was designed to help refugees from persecution in the Pale of Russia find jobs and community support and, secondarily, to reduce the Manhattan ghettoes and minimize antisemitism. In twenty-one years, the IRO distributed seventy-nine thousand East European Jews to over fifteen hundred cities and towns, including Chino, California; Des Moines, Iowa; and Pensacola, Florida. Wherever they went, these twice-displaced immigrants wrote letters to the IRO's main office. Robert A. Rockaway has selected, and translated from Yiddish, letters that describe the immigrants' new surroundings, work conditions, and living situations, as well as letters that give voice to typical tensions between the immigrants and their benefactors. Rockaway introduces the letters with an essay on conditions in the Pale and on early American Jewish attempts to assist emigrants.

The Uprooted

The Uprooted
Author: Göran Rystad
Release: 1990
Editor: Lund, Sweden : Lund University Press
Pages: 358
ISBN: UVA:X002077025
Language: en
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The Uprooted

The Uprooted
Author: Yehoshuʻa Aibeshits
Release: 2002
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 624
ISBN: UOM:39015056431425
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

A Survivorś Autobiography.

The Uprooted

The Uprooted
Author: Oscar Handlin
Release: 1951
Editor: Boston : Little, Brown
Pages: 332
ISBN: UOM:39015008234752
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

An Atlantic Monthly Press Book.

Oscar Handlin s The Uprooted

Oscar Handlin s The Uprooted
Author: Frederic Cople Jaher
Release: 1966
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 82
ISBN: UCAL:B3903562
Language: en
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Uprooted

Uprooted
Author: Grace Olmstead
Release: 2021-03-16
Editor: Penguin
Pages: 272
ISBN: 9780593084038
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

"A superior exploration of the consequences of the hollowing out of our agricultural heartlands."—Kirkus Reviews In the tradition of Wendell Berry, a young writer wrestles with what we owe the places we’ve left behind. In the tiny farm town of Emmett, Idaho, there are two kinds of people: those who leave and those who stay. Those who leave go in search of greener pastures, better jobs, and college. Those who stay are left to contend with thinning communities, punishing government farm policy, and environmental decay. Grace Olmstead, now a journalist in Washington, DC, is one who left, and in Uprooted, she examines the heartbreaking consequences of uprooting—for Emmett, and for the greater heartland America. Part memoir, part journalistic investigation, Uprooted wrestles with the questions of what we owe the places we come from and what we are willing to sacrifice for profit and progress. As part of her own quest to decide whether or not to return to her roots, Olmstead revisits the stories of those who, like her great-grandparents and grandparents, made Emmett a strong community and her childhood idyllic. She looks at the stark realities of farming life today, identifying the government policies and big agriculture practices that make it almost impossible for such towns to survive. And she explores the ranks of Emmett’s newcomers and what growth means for the area’s farming tradition. Avoiding both sentimental devotion to the past and blind faith in progress, Olmstead uncovers ways modern life attacks all of our roots, both metaphorical and literal. She brings readers face to face with the damage and brain drain left in the wake of our pursuit of self-improvement, economic opportunity, and so-called growth. Ultimately, she comes to an uneasy conclusion for herself: one can cultivate habits and practices that promote rootedness wherever one may be, but: some things, once lost, cannot be recovered.

Uprooted

Uprooted
Author: Naomi Novik
Release: 2015-05-19
Editor: Del Rey
Pages: 448
ISBN: 9780804179041
Language: en
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NEBULA AWARD WINNER • HUGO AWARD FINALIST • “If you want a fantasy with strong characters and brilliantly original variations on ancient stories, try Uprooted!”—Rick Riordan “Breathtaking . . . a tale that is both elegantly grand and earthily humble, familiar as a Grimm fairy tale yet fresh, original, and totally irresistible.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review) NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY NPR • BuzzFeed • Tordotcom • BookPage • Library Journal • Publishers Weekly Agnieszka loves her valley home, her quiet village, the forests and the bright shining river. But the corrupted Wood stands on the border, full of malevolent power, and its shadow lies over her life. Her people rely on the cold, driven wizard known only as the Dragon to keep its powers at bay. But he demands a terrible price for his help: one young woman handed over to serve him for ten years, a fate almost as terrible as falling to the Wood. The next choosing is fast approaching, and Agnieszka is afraid. She knows—everyone knows—that the Dragon will take Kasia: beautiful, graceful, brave Kasia, all the things Agnieszka isn’t, and her dearest friend in the world. And there is no way to save her. But Agnieszka fears the wrong things. For when the Dragon comes, it is not Kasia he will choose. Praise for Uprooted “Uprooted has leapt forward to claim the title of Best Book I’ve Read Yet This Year. . . . Moving, heartbreaking, and thoroughly satisfying, Uprooted is the fantasy novel I feel I’ve been waiting a lifetime for. Clear your schedule before picking it up, because you won’t want to put it down.”—NPR

Untold

Untold
Author: Gabrielle Deonath,Kamini Ramdeen
Release: 2021-03-02
Editor: Mascot Books
Pages: 320
ISBN: 1645437167
Language: en
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untold: defining moments of the uprooted is a collection of real stories that explores the South Asian experience in the U.S., U.K., and Canada through the lens of identity, being, and relationships. Thirty-two emerging voices share deeply personal moments relating to immigration, infertility, divorce, mental health, suicide, sexual orientation, gender identity, racism, colorism, casteism, religion, and much more, all while balancing the push and pull of belonging to two cultural hemispheres. Every story sheds light on the authentic truths of living as womxn with hyphenated identities that have only been whispered - until now.

The Uprooted

The Uprooted
Author: Esther Appelberg
Release: 1977
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 450
ISBN: UCAL:B4531556
Language: en
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Uprooted

Uprooted
Author: Page Dickey
Release: 2020-09-22
Editor: Timber Press
Pages: 356
ISBN: 9781643260518
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

The engaging story of leaving a beloved garden and creating a new, very different garden, by one of America’s best-known and most accomplished garden writers.

Uprooted

Uprooted
Author: Peter J. Boni
Release: 2022-01-25
Editor: Greenleaf Book Group
Pages: 313
ISBN: 9781626349087
Language: en
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How a journey of self-discovery unearthed the scandalous evolution of artificial insemination By his forties, Peter J. Boni was an accomplished CEO, with a specialty in navigating high-tech companies out of hot water. Just before his fiftieth birthday, Peter’s seventy-five-year-old mother unveiled a bombshell: His deceased father was not biological. Peter was conceived in 1945 via an anonymous sperm donor. The emotional upheaval upon learning that he was “misattributed” rekindled traumas long past and fueled his relentless research to find his genealogy. Over two decades, he gained an encyclopedic knowledge of the scientific, legal, and sociological history of reproductive technology as well as its practices, advances, and consequences. Through twenty-first century DNA analysis, Peter finally quenched his thirst for his origin. ​In Uprooted, Peter J. Boni intimately shares his personal odyssey and acquired expertise to spotlight the free market methods of gamete distribution that conceives dozens, sometimes hundreds, of unknowing half-siblings from a single donor. This thought-provoking book reveals the inner workings—and secrets—of the multibillion-dollar fertility industry, resulting in a richly detailed account of an ethical aspect of reproductive science that, until now, has not been so thoroughly explored.

Uprooted

Uprooted
Author: Albert Marrin
Release: 2016-10-25
Editor: Knopf Books for Young Readers
Pages: 258
ISBN: 9780553509366
Language: en
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A Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year A Booklist Editor's Choice On the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor comes a harrowing and enlightening look at the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II— from National Book Award finalist Albert Marrin Just seventy-five years ago, the American government did something that most would consider unthinkable today: it rounded up over 100,000 of its own citizens based on nothing more than their ancestry and, suspicious of their loyalty, kept them in concentration camps for the better part of four years. How could this have happened? Uprooted takes a close look at the history of racism in America and carefully follows the treacherous path that led one of our nation’s most beloved presidents to make this decision. Meanwhile, it also illuminates the history of Japan and its own struggles with racism and xenophobia, which led to the bombing of Pearl Harbor, ultimately tying the two countries together. Today, America is still filled with racial tension, and personal liberty in wartime is as relevant a topic as ever. Moving and impactful, National Book Award finalist Albert Marrin’s sobering exploration of this monumental injustice shines as bright a light on current events as it does on the past.

After the Boxes Are Unpacked

After the Boxes Are Unpacked
Author: Susan Miller
Release: 2016-04-01
Editor: NavPress
Pages: 279
ISBN: 9781624056468
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

An essential relocation guide refreshed and updated for today’s movers. More than 34 million Americans move each year, and studies show it can be one of the heaviest strains on a marriage. For women especially, relocating can be a traumatic event. With true stories, ingenious insights, and helpful hints, this great book makes transitioning smoother so women can get on with their lives. Those who are moving will find this valuable book as important as packing tape. Divided into three sections, After the Boxes are Unpacked helps recent movers focus on letting go of their past, starting over, and moving ahead. Topics include the following: How to manage the emotional stress of leaving family and friends How to support your spouse through a relocation How to build new relationships in a new city How to help children adjust to new surroundings and make friends How to find a new church home How to navigate financial challenges related to moving How to discover God’s will for you and your family in a new city This evergreen book has been a staple for movers for 20 years and has been extensively refreshed with additional content for today’s movers. “Susan is doing a tremendous job of helping women deal with the trauma of transition. This resource will help anyone who wants to move ahead in a healthy way after they’ve experienced a move. I highly recommend this book.” —John Trent, PhD, President of StrongFamilies.com

The Uprooted

The Uprooted
Author: Oscar Handlin
Release: 2002-02-20
Editor: University of Pennsylvania Press
Pages: 358
ISBN: 0812217888
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

"Oscar Handlin was the scholar most responsible for establishing the legitimacy of immigration history."--Gary Gerstle, author of