Framing America Art and architecture in the northern territories of New Spain c 900 1821

Framing America  Art and architecture in the northern territories of New Spain  c  900 1821
Author: Frances Kathryn Pohl
Release: 2017
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 600
ISBN: OCLC:1013934141
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

"Framing America takes an inclusive approach to American art. Along with comprehensive coverage of the canon, it expands and integrates treatment of frequently marginalized groups, while also addressing domestic arts and a range of political and social contexts. This fully revised fourth edition, reorganized in response to readers' suggestions, includes thirty-two chapters now arranged into nine parts, and available in two separate volumes; part openers featuring timelines and introductions that highlight how major events and artistic movements relate chronologically; increased coverage of the lives and work of women, African Americans, and Native Americans; new images--from a sixteenth-century print of the Spanish conquest of the Americas and a seventeenth-century embroidered altar frontal from New France, to nineteenth century American Impressionist landscape paintings and photographic portraits of San Francisco's Chinatown and Civil War battlefields; new review questions at the end of each chapter; instructor resources, including a fully revised test bank, the author's notes on using the book, links to further relevant material, and images for instructors"--

Framing America

Framing America
Author: Frances K. Pohl
Release: 2017
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 748
ISBN: 0500292973
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

An authoritative social history of American art, thoroughly revised to meet classroom needs

American Framing

American Framing
Author: Paul Andersen,Jayne Kelly,Paul Preissner
Release: 2020-11-15
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 136
ISBN: 3038601950
Language: en
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Originating in 1832 in Chicago with a balloon-framed warehouse designed by George Washington Snow, the technique of timber framing--also known at the time as "Chicago construction"--introduced softwood construction to the world. Timber frame construction quickly came to dominate the built landscape of America because of the ready availability of the principal material required, the simplicity of construction, and its ability to be erected by low or unskilled workers. The result was a built environment that erased typological and class distinctions of architectural production, as both rich and poor live in houses that are built the same way. American Framing: The Architecture of a Specific Anonymity is a visual and textual exploration of the conditions and consequences of these ubiquitous structures, the architecture which enables architecture. Archival drawings and historical images, along with newly commissioned photographs by Linda Robbennolt, Daniel Shea, and Chris Strong, in addition to plans and drawings, shed new light on this quintessentially American method of construction.

Framing American Divorce

Framing American Divorce
Author: Norma Basch
Release: 2001-08-24
Editor: Univ of California Press
Pages: 259
ISBN: 9780520231962
Language: en
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Framing American Divorce is a boldly innovative exploration of the multiple meanings of divorce in American life during the formative years of both the nation and its law, roughly 1770 to 1870. Drawing on a wide array of sources, Basch enriches and complicates our understanding of the development of divorce law by telling her story from three discrete but overlapping perspectives. In "Rules" she tracks the broad public debate and legislation over the appropriate grounds for and long-term consequences of divorce. "Mediations" shifts to a close-up analysis of the way ordinary women and men tested the rules in the county courts. And "Representations" charts the spiraling imagery of divorce through stories that made their way into American popular culture.

Framing American Politics

Framing American Politics
Author: Karen Callaghan and Frauke Schnell, eds.
Release: 2005
Editor: University of Pittsburgh Press
Pages: 264
ISBN: 9780822972723
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

Most issues in American political life are complex and multifaceted, subject to multiple interpretations and points of view. How issues are framed matters enormously for the way they are understood and debated. For example, is affirmative action a just means toward a diverse society, or is it reverse discrimination? Is the war on terror a defense of freedom and liberty, or is it an attack on privacy and other cherished constitutional rights? Bringing together some of the leading researchers in American politics, Framing American Politics explores the roles that interest groups, political elites, and the media play in framing political issues for the mass public. The contributors address some of the most hotly debated foreign and domestic policies in contemporary American life, focusing on both the origins and process of framing and its effects on citizens. In so doing, these scholars clearly demonstrate how frames can both enhance and hinder political participation and understanding.

Framing Class

Framing Class
Author: Diana Kendall
Release: 2011-04-16
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
Pages: 312
ISBN: 9781442202252
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

Framing Class explores how the media, including television, film, and news, depict wealth and poverty in the United States. Fully updated and revised throughout, the second edition of this groundbreaking book now includes discussions of new media, updated media sources, and provocative new examples from movies and television, such as The Real Housewives series and media portrayals of the new poor and corporate executives in the recent recession. The book introduces the concepts of class and media framing to students and analyzes how the media portray various social classes, from the elite to the very poor. Its accessible writing and powerful examples make it an ideal text or supplement for courses in sociology, American studies, and communications.

The White Racial Frame

The White Racial Frame
Author: Joe R. Feagin
Release: 2013-08-21
Editor: Routledge
Pages: 264
ISBN: 9781135127640
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

In this book Joe Feagin extends the systemic racism framework in previous Routledge books by developing an innovative concept, the white racial frame. Now four centuries-old, this white racial frame encompasses not only the stereotyping, bigotry, and racist ideology emphasized in other theories of "race," but also the visual images, array of emotions, sounds of accented language, interlinking interpretations and narratives, and inclinations to discriminate that are still central to the frame’s everyday operations. Deeply imbedded in American minds and institutions, this white racial frame has for centuries functioned as a broad worldview, one essential to the routine legitimation, scripting, and maintenance of systemic racism in the United States. Here Feagin examines how and why this white racial frame emerged in North America, how and why it has evolved socially over time, which racial groups are framed within it, how it has operated in the past and in the present for both white Americans and Americans of color, and how the latter have long responded with strategies of resistance that include enduring counter-frames. In this new edition, Feagin has included much new interview material and other data from recent research studies on framing issues related to white, black, Latino, and Asian Americans, and on society generally. The book also includes a new discussion of the impact of the white frame on popular culture, including on movies, video games, and television programs as well as a discussion of the white racial frame’s significant impacts on public policymaking, immigration, the environment, health care, and crime and imprisonment issues.

Re framing the Transnational Turn in American Studies

Re framing the Transnational Turn in American Studies
Author: Winfried Fluck,Donald E. Pease,John Carlos Rowe
Release: 2011
Editor: UPNE
Pages: 472
ISBN: 9781611681901
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

What is the state of American studies in the twenty-first century?

Framing the Threat

Framing the Threat
Author: Imke Köhler
Release: 2019-03-04
Editor: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
Pages: 292
ISBN: 9783110622355
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

There is great power in the use of words: words create most of what we consider to be real and true. Framing our words and narratives is thus a tool of power – but a power that also comes with limitations. This intriguing issue is the topic of Framing the Threat, an investigation of the relationship between language and security and of how discourse creates the scope of possibility for political action. In particular, the book scrutinizes and compares the security narratives of the former US presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama. It shows how their framings of identity, i.e., of the American ‘self’ and the enemy ‘other’ facilitated a certain construction of threat that shaped the presidents’ detention and interrogation policies. By defining what was necessary in the name of national security, Bush’s narrative justified the operation of the detention center at Guantanamo Bay and rendered the mistreatment of detainees possible – a situation that would have otherwise been illegal. Bush’s framings therefore enabled legal limits to be pushed and made the violation of rules appear legitimate. Obama, in contrast, constructed a threat scenario that required an end to rule violations, and the closure of Guantanamo for security reasons. According to this narrative, a return to the rule of law was imperative if the American people were to be kept safe. However, Obama’s framing was continually challenged, and it was never able to dominate public discourse. Consequently, Framing the Threat argues Obama was unable to implement the policy changes he had announced.

Mapping the Cold War

Mapping the Cold War
Author: Timothy Barney
Release: 2015-04-13
Editor: UNC Press Books
Pages: 339
ISBN: 9781469618555
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

In this fascinating history of Cold War cartography, Timothy Barney considers maps as central to the articulation of ideological tensions between American national interests and international aspirations. Barney argues that the borders, scales, projections, and other conventions of maps prescribed and constrained the means by which foreign policy elites, popular audiences, and social activists navigated conflicts between North and South, East and West. Maps also influenced how identities were formed in a world both shrunk by advancing technologies and marked by expanding and shifting geopolitical alliances and fissures. Pointing to the necessity of how politics and values were "spatialized" in recent U.S. history, Barney argues that Cold War–era maps themselves had rhetorical lives that began with their conception and production and played out in their circulation within foreign policy circles and popular media. Reflecting on the ramifications of spatial power during the period, Mapping the Cold War ultimately demonstrates that even in the twenty-first century, American visions of the world--and the maps that account for them--are inescapably rooted in the anxieties of that earlier era.

African Americans and the Culture of Pain

African Americans and the Culture of Pain
Author: Debra Walker King
Release: 2008
Editor: University of Virginia Press
Pages: 212
ISBN: 0813926904
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

In this compelling new study, Debra Walker King considers fragments of experience recorded in oral histories and newspapers as well as those produced in twentieth-century novels, films, and television that reveal how the black body in pain functions as a rhetorical device and as political strategy. King's primary hypothesis is that, in the United States, black experience of the body in pain is as much a construction of social, ethical, and economic politics as it is a physiological phenomenon. As an essential element defining black experience in America, pain plays many roles. It is used to promote racial stereotypes, increase the sale of movies and other pop culture products, and encourage advocacy for various social causes. Pain is employed as a tool of resistance against racism, but it also functions as a sign of racism's insidious ability to exert power over and maintain control of those it claims--regardless of race. With these dichotomous uses of pain in mind, King considers and questions the effects of the manipulation of an unspoken but long-standing belief that pain, suffering, and the hope for freedom and communal subsistence will merge to uplift those who are oppressed, especially during periods of social and political upheaval. This belief has become a ritualized philosophy fueling the multiple constructions of black bodies in pain, a belief that has even come to function as an identity and community stabilizer. In her attempt to interpret the constant manipulation and abuse of this philosophy, King explores the redemptive and visionary power of pain as perceived historically in black culture, the aesthetic value of black pain as presented in a variety of cultural artifacts, and the socioeconomic politics of suffering surrounding the experiences and representations of blacks in the United States. The book introduces the term Blackpain, defining it as a tool of national mythmaking and as a source of cultural and symbolic capital that normalizes individual suffering until the individual--the real person--disappears. Ultimately, the book investigates America's love-hate relationship with black bodies in pain.

Poisonous Muse

Poisonous Muse
Author: Sara L. Crosby
Release: 2016-04-15
Editor: University of Iowa Press
Pages: 236
ISBN: 9781609384036
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

According to Sara Crosby, the new popular ‘power of horror’—in writings by Poe and many others—gave American authors a new way of moving beyond beauty through the ‘poisonous muse.’ This new power corresponds to the vitalizing changes in Jacksonian America and brings with it a major change in US literary history. Her study of these changes in the US cultural scene is an incredibly engaging, vibrant narrative.

Framing Flynn

Framing Flynn
Author: Dave Erickson
Release: 2020-12-29
Editor: Post Hill Press
Pages: 306
ISBN: 9781642937305
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

What happened to General Flynn was a cog in the machine that powered the biggest political scandal in American history. The set up began when people who worked for the sitting president of the United States of America, Barack H. Obama, weaponized agencies of the government to spy on the Donald Trump campaign—justifying it with manufactured evidence paid for by Hillary Clinton and the Democratic National Committee. But, when their effort to defeat Trump failed on Election Night, the administration launched a deep-state assault that began with one of the most subversive criminal acts ever committed in American politics. "He was an innocent man. He was targeted by the Obama administration and he was targeted in order to try and take down a president.” —President Donald J. Trump

Racialized Politics

Racialized Politics
Author: David O. Sears,James Sidanius,Jim Sidanius,Lawrence Bobo
Release: 2000-02-15
Editor: University of Chicago Press
Pages: 458
ISBN: 0226744051
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

Are Americans less prejudiced now than they were thirty years ago, or has racism simply gone "underground"? Is racism something we learn as children, or is it a result of certain social groups striving to maintain their privileged positions in society? In Racialized Politics, political scientists, sociologists, and psychologists explore the current debate surrounding the sources of racism in America. Published here for the first time, the essays represent three major approaches to the topic. The social psychological approach maintains that prejudice socialized early in life feeds racial stereotypes, while the social structural viewpoint argues that behavior is shaped by whites' fear of losing their privileged status. The third perspective looks to non-racially inspired ideology, including attitudes about the size and role of government, as the reason for opposition to policies such as affirmative action. Timely and important, this collection provides a state-of-the-field assessment of the current issues and findings on the role of racism in mass politics and public opinion. Contributors are Lawrence Bobo, Gretchen C. Crosby, Michael C. Dawson, Christopher Federico, P. J. Henry, John J. Hetts, Jennifer L. Hochschild, William G. Howell, Michael Hughes, Donald R. Kinder, Rick Kosterman, Tali Mendelberg, Thomas F. Pettigrew, Howard Schuman, David O. Sears, James Sidanius, Pam Singh, Paul M. Sniderman, Marylee C. Taylor, and Steven A. Tuch.

America Becoming Framing Our Declaration of Interdepence Framing Our

America Becoming  Framing Our Declaration of Interdepence  Framing Our
Author: Lisa C. Uhrik
Release: 2021-07-04
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 184
ISBN: 1970137185
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

Use this book as a personal or group workbook using the READ3 framework to refine your personal manifesto - your own Declarations of Interdependence for yourself, your family, and your community

Re Framing the Arab Muslim

 Re  Framing the Arab Muslim
Author: Silke Schmidt
Release: 2014-10-31
Editor: transcript Verlag
Pages: 446
ISBN: 9783839429150
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

Media depictions of Arabs and Muslims continue to be framed by images of camels, belly dancers, and dagger-wearing terrorists. But do only Hollywood movies and TV news have the power to frame public discourse? This interdisciplinary study transfers media framing theory to literary studies to show how life writing (re-)frames Orientalist stereotypes. The innovative analysis of the post-9/11 autobiographies »West of Kabul, East of New York«, »Letters from Cairo«, and »Howling in Mesopotamia« makes a powerful claim to approach literature based on a theory of production and reception, thus enhancing the multi-disciplinary potential of framing theory.

Framing China

Framing China
Author: Ariane Knüsel
Release: 2016-04-15
Editor: Routledge
Pages: 336
ISBN: 9781317133605
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

Framing China sheds new light on Western relations with and perceptions of China in the first half of the twentieth century. In this ground-breaking book, Ariane Knüsel examines how China was portrayed in political debates and the media in Britain, the USA and Switzerland between 1900 and 1950. By focusing on the political, economic, cultural and social context that led to the construction of the particular images of China in each country, the author demonstrates that national interests, anxieties and issues influenced the way China was framed and resulted in different portrayals of China in each country. The author’s meticulous analysis of a vast amount of newspaper and magazine articles, commentaries, editorials, cartoons and newsreels that have previously not been studied before also focuses on the transnational circulation of images of China. While previous publications have dealt with the occurrence of the Yellow Peril and Red Menace in particular countries, Framing China reveals that these images were interpreted differently in every nation because they both reflected and contributed to the discursive construction of nationhood in each country and were influenced by domestic issues, cultural values, pre-existing stereotypes, pressure groups and geopolitical aspirations.

Against the Unspeakable

Against the Unspeakable
Author: Naomi Mandel
Release: 2006
Editor: University of Virginia Press
Pages: 300
ISBN: 0813925819
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

In Against the Unspeakable, Naomi Mandel offers a paradigm of reading that will enable the crucial work on comparative atrocities and the representation of suffering to move beyond the impasse of "unspeakability." Discussing a variety of texts such as Toni Morrison's Beloved, Steven Spielburg's Schindler's List, and William Styron's Confessions of Nat Turner, Mandel asks: What does the evocation of the limits of language enable writers, authors, and critics to do?

Until Justice Be Done America s First Civil Rights Movement from the Revolution to Reconstruction

Until Justice Be Done  America s First Civil Rights Movement  from the Revolution to Reconstruction
Author: Kate Masur
Release: 2021-03-23
Editor: W. W. Norton & Company
Pages: 480
ISBN: 9781324005940
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

Finalist for the 2022 Pulitzer Prize in History Finalist for the 2022 Lincoln Prize Winner of the 2022 John Nau Book Prize in American Civil War Era History One of NPR's Best Books of 2021 and a New York Times Critics' Top Book of 2021 A groundbreaking history of the movement for equal rights that courageously battled racist laws and institutions, Northern and Southern, in the decades before the Civil War. The half-century before the Civil War was beset with conflict over equality as well as freedom. Beginning in 1803, many free states enacted laws that discouraged free African Americans from settling within their boundaries and restricted their rights to testify in court, move freely from place to place, work, vote, and attend public school. But over time, African American activists and their white allies, often facing mob violence, courageously built a movement to fight these racist laws. They countered the states’ insistences that states were merely trying to maintain the domestic peace with the equal-rights promises they found in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. They were pastors, editors, lawyers, politicians, ship captains, and countless ordinary men and women, and they fought in the press, the courts, the state legislatures, and Congress, through petitioning, lobbying, party politics, and elections. Long stymied by hostile white majorities and unfavorable court decisions, the movement’s ideals became increasingly mainstream in the 1850s, particularly among supporters of the new Republican party. When Congress began rebuilding the nation after the Civil War, Republicans installed this vision of racial equality in the 1866 Civil Rights Act and the Fourteenth Amendment. These were the landmark achievements of the first civil rights movement. Kate Masur’s magisterial history delivers this pathbreaking movement in vivid detail. Activists such as John Jones, a free Black tailor from North Carolina whose opposition to the Illinois “black laws” helped make the case for racial equality, demonstrate the indispensable role of African Americans in shaping the American ideal of equality before the law. Without enforcement, promises of legal equality were not enough. But the antebellum movement laid the foundation for a racial justice tradition that remains vital to this day.

Framing Disease

Framing Disease
Author: Charles E. Rosenberg,Janet Lynne Golden
Release: 1992
Editor: Rutgers University Press
Pages: 360
ISBN: 0813517575
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

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