Neither Snow Nor Rain

Neither Snow Nor Rain
Author: Devin Leonard
Release: 2016-05-03
Editor: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic
Pages: 288
ISBN: 9780802189974
Language: en
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“[The] book makes you care what happens to its main protagonist, the U.S. Postal Service itself. And, as such, it leaves you at the end in suspense.” —USA Today Founded by Benjamin Franklin, the United States Postal Service was the information network that bound far-flung Americans together, and yet, it is slowly vanishing. Critics say it is slow and archaic. Mail volume is down. The workforce is shrinking. Post offices are closing. In Neither Snow Nor Rain, journalist Devin Leonard tackles the fascinating, centuries-long history of the USPS, from the first letter carriers through Franklin’s days, when postmasters worked out of their homes and post roads cut new paths through the wilderness. Under Andrew Jackson, the post office was molded into a vast patronage machine, and by the 1870s, over seventy percent of federal employees were postal workers. As the country boomed, USPS aggressively developed new technology, from mobile post offices on railroads and airmail service to mechanical sorting machines and optical character readers. Neither Snow Nor Rain is a rich, multifaceted history, full of remarkable characters, from the stamp-collecting FDR, to the revolutionaries who challenged USPS’s monopoly on mail, to the renegade union members who brought the system—and the country—to a halt in the 1970s. “Delectably readable . . . Leonard’s account offers surprises on almost every other page . . . [and] delivers both the triumphs and travails with clarity, wit and heart.” —Chicago Tribune

Neither Snow Nor Rain

Neither Snow Nor Rain
Author: Devin Leonard
Release: 2017-01-10
Editor: Grove Press
Pages: 336
ISBN: 0802126405
Language: en
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The United States Postal Service is a wondrous American creation. Seven days a week, its army of 300,000 letter carriers delivers 513 million pieces of mail, more than forty percent of the world’s volume. It is far more efficient than any other mail service--more than twice as efficient as the Japanese and easily outpacing the Germans and British. And the USPS has a storied history. Founded by Benjamin Franklin, it was the information network that bound far-flung Americans together, fostered a common culture, and helped American business to prosper. A first-class stamp remains one of the greatest bargains of all time, and yet, the USPS is slowly vanishing. Critics say it is slow and archaic. Mail volume is down. The workforce is shrinking. Post offices are closing. InNeither Snow nor Rain, journalist Devin Leonard tackles the fascinating, centuries-long story of the USPS, from the first letter carriers through Franklin’s days, when postmasters worked out of their homes and post roads cut new paths through the wilderness. Under Andrew Jackson, the post office was molded into a vast patronage machine, and by the 1870s, over seventy percent of federal employees were postal workers. As the country boomed, the USPS aggressively developed new technology, from mobile post offices on railroad cars and Air Mail Service to mechanical sorting machines and optical character readers. Neither Snow nor Rain is a rich, multifaceted history, full of remarkable characters, from the stamp-collecting FDR, to the revolutionaries who challenged USPS’s monopoly on mail, to the renegade union members who brought the system--and the country--to a halt in the 1970s. An exciting and engrossing read,Neither Snow nor Rain is the first major history of the USPS in over fifty years.

Neither Snow Nor Rain

Neither Snow Nor Rain
Author: Devin Leonard
Release: 2021-11-16
Editor: Grove Press
Pages: 0
ISBN: 080215901X
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

"In Neither Snow Nor Rain, journalist Devin Leonard tackles the fascinating, centuries-long history of the USPS, from the first letter carriers through Franklin’s days, when postmasters worked out of their homes and post roads cut new paths through the wilderness. Under Andrew Jackson, the post office was molded into a vast patronage machine, and by the 1870s, over seventy percent of federal employees were postal workers. As the country boomed, USPS aggressively developed new technology, from mobile post offices on railroads and air mail service to mechanical sorting machines and optical character readers. Neither Snow Nor Rain is a rich, multifaceted history, full of remarkable characters, from the stamp-collecting FDR, to the revolutionaries who challenged USPS’s monopoly on mail, to the renegade union members who brought the system—and the country—to a halt in the 1970s. An exciting and engrossing read, Neither Snow Nor Rain is the first major history of the USPS in over fifty years"--

How the Post Office Created America

How the Post Office Created America
Author: Winifred Gallagher
Release: 2016-06-28
Editor: Penguin
Pages: 336
ISBN: 9780399564031
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

A masterful history of a long underappreciated institution, How the Post Office Created America examines the surprising role of the postal service in our nation’s political, social, economic, and physical development. The founders established the post office before they had even signed the Declaration of Independence, and for a very long time, it was the U.S. government’s largest and most important endeavor—indeed, it was the government for most citizens. This was no conventional mail network but the central nervous system of the new body politic, designed to bind thirteen quarrelsome colonies into the United States by delivering news about public affairs to every citizen—a radical idea that appalled Europe’s great powers. America’s uniquely democratic post powerfully shaped its lively, argumentative culture of uncensored ideas and opinions and made it the world’s information and communications superpower with astonishing speed. Winifred Gallagher presents the history of the post office as America’s own story, told from a fresh perspective over more than two centuries. The mandate to deliver the mail—then “the media”—imposed the federal footprint on vast, often contested parts of the continent and transformed a wilderness into a social landscape of post roads and villages centered on post offices. The post was the catalyst of the nation’s transportation grid, from the stagecoach lines to the airlines, and the lifeline of the great migration from the Atlantic to the Pacific. It enabled America to shift from an agrarian to an industrial economy and to develop the publishing industry, the consumer culture, and the political party system. Still one of the country’s two major civilian employers, the post was the first to hire women, African Americans, and other minorities for positions in public life. Starved by two world wars and the Great Depression, confronted with the country’s increasingly anti-institutional mind-set, and struggling with its doubled mail volume, the post stumbled badly in the turbulent 1960s. Distracted by the ensuing modernization of its traditional services, however, it failed to transition from paper mail to email, which prescient observers saw as its logical next step. Now the post office is at a crossroads. Before deciding its future, Americans should understand what this grand yet overlooked institution has accomplished since 1775 and consider what it should and could contribute in the twenty-first century. Gallagher argues that now, more than ever before, the imperiled post office deserves this effort, because just as the founders anticipated, it created forward-looking, communication-oriented, idea-driven America.

There s Always Work at the Post Office

There s Always Work at the Post Office
Author: Philip F. Rubio
Release: 2010-05-15
Editor: Univ of North Carolina Press
Pages: 472
ISBN: 0807895733
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

This book brings to life the important but neglected story of African American postal workers and the critical role they played in the U.S. labor and black freedom movements. Historian Philip Rubio, a former postal worker, integrates civil rights, labor, and left movement histories that too often are written as if they happened separately. Centered on New York City and Washington, D.C., the book chronicles a struggle of national significance through its examination of the post office, a workplace with facilities and unions serving every city and town in the United States. Black postal workers--often college-educated military veterans--fought their way into postal positions and unions and became a critical force for social change. They combined black labor protest and civic traditions to construct a civil rights unionism at the post office. They were a major factor in the 1970 nationwide postal wildcat strike, which resulted in full collective bargaining rights for the major postal unions under the newly established U.S. Postal Service in 1971. In making the fight for equality primary, African American postal workers were influential in shaping today's post office and postal unions.

The Persian Wars

The Persian Wars
Author: Herodotus
Release: 2021-04-10
Editor: Good Press
Pages: 576
ISBN: EAN:4064066464400
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

"The Persian Wars" by Herodotus (translated by A. D. Godley). Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Moments in Time

Moments in Time
Author: John E. Phinazee,Larry G. Weaver
Release: 2003-11
Editor: iUniverse
Pages: 180
ISBN: 9780595302734
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

In the hallway, during a break in trial, the famed defense attorney spoke to the Postal Inspector. "You're a helluva investigator." And the Inspector said, "What do you mean?" "That interview you did with Frank," the lawyer said. Recalling the hours he had spent questioning the attorney's client, the Inspector asked, "What did I leave out?" As he turned to enter the courtroom, to stand beside his client and face the judge, the lawyer sighed, "Absolutely nothing!" In Moments in Time, Bill Phinazee and Larry Weaver tell what it's like to be a United States Postal Inspector. Some of their stories are uncomplicated, some are complex, and others are amusing, poignant or chilling. All are entertaining. They tell why a Postal Inspector is respected by his or her peers, feared by law breakers, and known by both as a "helluva investigator" whose investigations leave out absolutely nothing.

The Lost Package

The Lost Package
Author: Richard Ho
Release: 2021-03-02
Editor: Roaring Brook Press
Pages: 40
ISBN: 9781250829238
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

Like other packages, this one began as an empty box. It was packed with great care, sealed tight, and given a personal touch. Like other packages, it left the post office with hope. But unlike most packages, before it got to its desitnation... it got lost. Follow one package that loses its way and discover a friendship tale that proves distance can't always keep us apart.

Space Bastards

Space Bastards
Author: Joe Aubrey,Eric Peterson,Darick Robertson
Release: 2021-02-10
Editor: Humanoids, Inc.
Pages: 35
ISBN: 9781643377964
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

Acclaimed artist Darick Robertson (The Boys, HAPPY!) joins writers Eric Peterson and Joe Aubrey to bring you the tale of the galaxy’s most dangerous employers: The IPS!

Snail Mail

Snail Mail
Author: Samantha Berger
Release: 2018-05-01
Editor: Running Press Kids
Pages: 32
ISBN: 9780762462520
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

A long, long time ago, before email and texting, the mail was delivered in a much slower way-it was called Snail Mail (because some thought it was delivered by a snail). Although it took much longer, everyone agreed that letters were a little more special when they were delivered by Snail Mail. They might be handwritten. They might include a drawing. They might even contain a surprise inside! One such letter was sent by a Girl to the Boy she loved, and it was up to four special snails to deliver her card across the country. The snails trek across the country-through desert heat and dangerous blizzards, across mountains and plains, through cities and forests-and along the way, they find that taking time to slow down and look around makes the journey all the more beautiful. Snail Mail's playful and educational story encourages kids to have slow living, and to approach life with determination and wonder. Julia Patton's rich illustrations showcase America's diverse terrain and national monuments from coast to coast. Kids and parents alike will delight in this celebration of America's beauty and the power of a simple handwritten letter.

The Athlete Inside

The Athlete Inside
Author: Sue Reynolds
Release: 2020-04-28
Editor: Fortress Press
Pages: 200
ISBN: 9781506458816
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

Four years ago, Sue Reynolds was morbidly obese at 335 pounds. After being on yo-yo diets almost all her life, she tried one more time without much hope for positive results. But this time was different. She was fed up with not being able to do things because of her size. She was tired of not being able to tie her own shoes, fit in restaurant booths, or walk more than a few feet. She was ready. The Athlete Inside follows Reynolds's journey as she lost 200 pounds and found an athlete hiding inside her body. From her first walk to the neighbor's mailbox to finishing sixth at the World Triathlon Championship, Reynolds discovered the joy of conquering fear and pride to find that the best version of herself had been there all along. A world-class triathlete and a grandmother, Reynolds is proof that you can transform your life at any age. Her story is one of hope, tenacity, and faith, as she committed to doing whatever it took to be among the best triathletes in the world. It's a story about a unique intergenerational relationship between Reynolds and the young coach who earned her trust and helped her develop fitness and confidence. It's a story about the power of kindness and the spiritual growth Reynolds experienced as she realized the compassion that surrounded her was the face of God. Ultimately, it's the story of how each of us can discover amazing gifts and talents within ourselves.

Deliver Me

Deliver Me
Author: Terry Flippo
Release: 2018-09-23
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 92
ISBN: 1724283480
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

You see them driving down your street and walking through your neighborhood, but how well do you know your lettercarrier? Deliver Me! takes you behind the scenes for an hilarious look at the lives of these ubiquitous civil servants. Whether it's dealing with dogs, unruly customers, or the puzzling demands of management, it's all in a day's work for these everyday heroes!

Calico Dorsey

Calico Dorsey
Author: Susan Lendroth
Release: 2010-09-28
Editor: Tricycle Press
Pages: 34
ISBN: 9781582463186
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

Neither rain, nor snow, nor gloom of night kept this poch from his appointed rounds! Back in the 1880s, when the Old West boomed with the rush for gold and silver, the miners of Calico, California, needed a mail carrier they could count on. And they found him in a Border collie named Dorsey. Based on the true story of the most celebrated canine mail carrier in U.S. history, Calico Dorsey tells the tale of a winsome stray who found both a home and a calling on the mining trails of the Old West. An Author's Note includes a photograph of the real-life Dorsey, as well as historical information about the dog and the mining town he called home.

Beyond Going Postal

Beyond Going Postal
Author: Stephen Musacco, Ph.d.
Release: 2009-01-27
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 245
ISBN: 1439220751
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

This book provides an answer to the question: Why has there been so much violence in the U.S. Postal Service and what can be done to prevent it?

The Last Mailman Neither Rain Nor Sleet Nor Zombies

The Last Mailman  Neither Rain  Nor Sleet  Nor Zombies
Author: Kevin J. Burke
Release: 2011-10-15
Editor: Permuted Press
Pages: 329
ISBN: 9781934861981
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

Four-year degree in business. Trained in hand-to-hand combat. Works well with zombies. This is the resume of the last mailman on Earth. It is the near future, and the modern world we knew has been overrun and destroyed by reanimated corpses who hunt humans for food. Mankind has retreated to small pockets of civilization and practically surrendered to the walking dead. But one man routinely leaves behind the safety and comfort to find the people and things we’ve long abandoned. He battles the elements. He battles his own brewing insanity. But mostly, he battles zombies.

First Class

First Class
Author: Christopher W. Shaw
Release: 2021-10-31
Editor: City Lights Books
Pages: 329
ISBN: 9780872868557
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

Investigating the essential role that the postal system plays in American democracy and how the corporate sector has attempted to destroy it. "With First Class: The U.S. Postal Service, Democracy, and the Corporate Threat, Christopher Shaw makes a brilliant case for polishing the USPS up and letting it shine in the 21st century."—John Nichols, national affairs correspondent for The Nation and author of Coronavirus Criminals and Pandemic Profiteers: Accountability for Those Who Caused the Crisis The fight over the future of the U.S. Postal Service is on. For years, corporate interests and political ideologues have pushed to remake the USPS, turning it from a public institution into a private business—and now, with mail-in voting playing a key role in local, state, and federal elections, the attacks have escalated. Leadership at the USPS has been handed over to special interests whose plan for the future includes higher postage costs, slower delivery times, and fewer post offices, policies that will inevitably weaken this invaluable public service and source of employment. Despite the general shift to digital communication, the vast majority of the American people—and small businesses—still rely heavily on the U.S. postal system, and many are rallying to defend it. First Class brings readers to the front lines of the struggle, explaining the various forces at work for and against a strong postal system, and presenting reasonable ideas for strengthening and expanding its capacity, services, and workforce. Emphasizing the essential role the USPS has played ever since Benjamin Franklin served as our first Postmaster General, author Christopher Shaw warns of the consequences for the country—and for our democracy—if we don’t win this fight. Praise for First Class: Piece by piece, an essential national infrastructure is being dismantled without our consent. Shaw makes an eloquent case for why the post office is worth saving and why, for the sake of American democracy, it must be saved."—Steve Hutkins, founder/editor of Save the Post Office and Professor of English at New York University "The USPS is essential for a democratic American society; thank goodness we have this new book from Christopher W. Shaw explaining why."—Danny Caine, author of Save the USPS and owner of the Raven Book Store, Lawrence, KS "Shaw's excellent analysis of the Postal Service and its vital role in American Democracy couldn't be more timely. … First Class should serve as a clarion call for Americans to halt the dismantling and to, instead, preserve and enhance the institution that can bind the nation together."—Ruth Y. Goldway, Retired Chair and Commissioner, U.S. Postal Regulatory Commission, responsible for the Forever Stamps "In a time of community fracture and corporate predation, Shaw argues, a first-class post office of the future can bring communities together and offer exploitation-free banking and other services."—Robert Weissman, president of Public Citizen

You Wouldn t Want to Be a Pony Express Rider

You Wouldn t Want to Be a Pony Express Rider
Author: Tom Ratliff,Mark Bergin,David Salariya
Release: 2012
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 32
ISBN: 0531208729
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

Describes the disadvantages to being a Pony Express rider, including riding in all weather, natural disasters, and disease.

Pete the P O d Postal Worker

Pete  the P  O   d Postal Worker
Author: Marcus Pierce Meleton
Release: 2003-01-01
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 152
ISBN: 0963582666
Language: en
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Going Postal

Going Postal
Author: Terry Pratchett
Release: 2009-10-13
Editor: Harper Collins
Pages: 416
ISBN: 9780061807190
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

A splendid send-up of government, the postal system, and everything that lies in between in this newest entry in Terry Pratchett’s internationally bestselling Discworld series. Convicted con man and forger Moist von Lipwig is given a choice: Face the hangman’s noose, or get Ankh Morpork’s ancient Post Office up and running efficiently! It was a tough decision . . . Now, the former criminal is facing really big problems. There’s tons of undelivered mail. Ghosts are talking to him. One of the postmen is 18,000 years old. And you really wouldn’t want to know what his new girlfriend can do with a shoe. To top it all off, shadowy characters don’t want the mail moved. Instead, they want him dead—deader than all those dead letters. (And here he’d thought that all he’d have to face was rain, snow, and gloom of night . . .)

The Lost Pianos of Siberia

The Lost Pianos of Siberia
Author: Sophy Roberts
Release: 2020-08-04
Editor: Grove Press
Pages: 437
ISBN: 9780802149305
Language: en
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DESCRIPTION BOOK:

This “melodious” mix of music, history, and travelogue “reveals a story inextricably linked to the drama of Russia itself . . . These pages sing like a symphony.” —The Wall Street Journal Siberia’s story is traditionally one of exiles, penal colonies, and unmarked graves. Yet there is another tale to tell. Dotted throughout this remote land are pianos—grand instruments created during the boom years of the nineteenth century, as well as humble Soviet-made uprights that found their way into equally modest homes. They tell the story of how, ever since entering Russian culture under the westernizing influence of Catherine the Great, piano music has run through the country like blood. How these pianos traveled into this snowbound wilderness in the first place is testament to noble acts of fortitude by governors, adventurers, and exiles. Siberian pianos have accomplished extraordinary feats, from the instrument that Maria Volkonsky, wife of an exiled Decembrist revolutionary, used to spread music east of the Urals, to those that brought reprieve to the Soviet Gulag. That these instruments might still exist in such a hostile landscape is remarkable. That they are still capable of making music in far-flung villages is nothing less than a miracle. The Lost Pianos of Siberia follows Roberts on a three-year adventure as she tracks a number of instruments to find one whose history is definitively Siberian. Her journey reveals a desolate land inhabited by wild tigers and deeply shaped by its dark history, yet one that is also profoundly beautiful—and peppered with pianos. “An elegant and nuanced journey through literature, through history, through music, murder and incarceration and revolution, through snow and ice and remoteness, to discover the human face of Siberia. I loved this book.” —Paul Theroux